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Website Design

Coming in 2015: Guild Webinars on Responsive Design, Web fonts, and Game Design

Posted by Rebecca Blake on December 22, 2014

We’ve been working on new Guild webinars for 2015, and have lined up a full slate for the first quarter. Our confirmed presenters so far are Eric Fadiman on Responsive Web Design (February 18), Dana Leavey on Positioning & Marketing Yourself as a Designer (March 18), and Joey Ellis on Game Design & Development (April 15). Bookmark our website for updated news on Guild webinars, or follow us on Twitter, LinkedIn, and Facebook. Or keep an eye out for our emailed invitation.

 Guild members are invited to join our webinars for free – please pre-register since space can sell out. Non-members can attend for $45. You can also view our archived webinars. Members can log into our website to view all our archived webinars for free. Non-members can view any single archived webinar for $35. Our most recent archived webinars are The All-Illustration Pricing Game, and Anatomy of a Design Proposal with Michael Janda.

24 Ways to Impress Your (Web Geek) Friends

Posted by Rebecca Blake on December 18, 2014

24 Ways category iconsCelebrating it’s 10th anniversary, 24 ways, the advent calendar for web geeks, is back in fine form. 24 ways was started in December of 2005 by web developer Drew McLellan. McLellan published the blog throughout the month with daily articles on web code, productivity, client management, business – anything and everything a web developer might need. As McLellan writes, “There’s a lot of fun to be had in learning something that will impress those you work with – especially if then you can share what you know to everyone’s benefit.”

This year’s offering continues to delight, with articles from a wide range of experts weighing in on everything from SEO to graphics creation to carpal tunnel syndrome. Articles can be searched and sorted by major topics: business, code, content, design, process, and UX. Articles going back to the very first edition of 24 ways continue to be published, providing a rich resource for developers.

The clean, pared-down website was designed by Paul Robert Lloyd and built on the Perch Runway platform. (24 ways has included a complete colophon which credits everyone involved in the creation of the website.) For updates on each publication, readers can subscribe to 24 ways’ newsletter or RSS feed, or follow them on Twitter.

24 Ways screen shot

Illustration/Animation Project Yule Log 2014 Donates Licensing Fee to C/I

Posted by Rebecca Blake on December 08, 2014

Dan Savage © Yule Log 2.014The second season of Yule Log (Yule Log 2.014) has been published, featuring the illustration and animation efforts of over 80 artists. The website features 70 short animations of yule logs curated by the animation studio Oddfellows. This year’s selection features the imaginative creations we’ve come to expect, such as the espionage-inspired Silent Knights by Joe Russ, Ben Tillett, and Syd Weiler; Chris Lohouse and Salih Abdul-Karim’s homage to 1920s cartooning, Stay Tooned; and Erin Kilkenny’s lovely retro, Smoke on the Water.

Yule Log creator Dan Savage designed the project to reimagine WPIX-11 (NY) TV’s Yule Log broadcast loop. Last year’s publication was a huge success, with over 1 million viewings and extensive coverage in industry blogs. This year, Viacom/MTV licensed Yule Log 2.014 to play in their lobby. Their licensing fee – all $2,000 – was donated to C/I, an organization which teaches computing, leadership, and professionalism skills to underserved high school students in after-school programs, camps, and paid summer internships.

Top right: Dan Savage's contribution to Yule Log.

Below: (clockwise) Silent Knights by Joe Russ, Ben Tillett, and Syd Weiler; Stay Tooned by Chris Lohouse and Salih Abdul-Karim; So You Say There's a Chance by Ege Soyeur and Nick Petley; Log Ride by Impactist; Smoke on the Water by Erin Kilkenny; and Hello Old Friend by James Wignall.

© Yule Log 2.014

Best Typography Websites Showcases Fonts in Action

Posted by Rebecca Blake on November 12, 2014

Designer Jeremiah Shoaf showcases webfonts in action in his ongoing blog series, “The Best Typography-Based Sites…” Every month, Shoaf showcases his favorite websites, discusses the typography behind each, and provides links to both the websites and the foundries featuring the webfonts. The series is avaluable tool for designers — the web fonts are shown in action, and a wide range of websites are covered. For example, “The Best Typography-Based Sites of October 2014,” covers sites created for a design and illustration studio, a law firm, a restaurant, and a magazine.

The blog is hosted on TypeWolf, Shoaf’s website determined to “help designers choose the perfect font for their next design project.” (Earlier articles in “The Best…” series are hosted on Type and Grids.) For those who need a daily inspiration, Typewolf publishes a “Site of the Day” as well. A comprehensive resources page includes learning resources, links to purchasing and hosting webfonts, foundries and type designer, blogs, forums, organizations, and books.

Below: The Best Typography-Based Sites of October included this elegant design for Violaine & Jérémy, utilizing Stanley, Regular, and Caslon typefaces. Image used with permission.

Violaine and Jeremy interface, featured Best Typography-Based Sites of October

Exhaustion, Obsolescence, and Self-Worth

Posted by Rebecca Blake on September 24, 2014

In May, designer Jason Santa Maria published an article speculating on what course his career (and life) would take should he ever stop designing websites. Considering the impressive trajectory of his career, the article was notable. Santa Maria is a Senior Designer at Vox Media, founded of Typedia and A Book Apart, formerly worked as creative director of An Event Apart and Typekit, served as an AIGA/NY vice president, authored On Web Typography, and currently teaches at SVA’s Interactive Design program. What would make an individual with such extraordinary experience question his future in his chosen field?

In “What’s Next,” Santa Maria explains that he’s preparing for the possibility that someday he won’t be able to (or interested in) continuing his career in web design: “I don’t think it’s unrealistic to think that there will be a time when I don’t want to, or can’t — due to fatigue or professional obsolescence — work in this industry anymore.” He worries that his own fascination with bygone skills, such as handset typography, and his drive to explore deeply into topics will leave him off-guard as technology progresses. He concludes by speculating that “[f]lexibility in work habits and in thinking, rather than languages and programs, might be our most useful skills.”

However, in a follow-up article, “Correspondence with an Ex-Designer,” Santa Maria reveals a deeper disquiet that lead to his soul searching. A reader named Ruth responded to his earlier article by describing her journey from designer to sheep farmer, reassuring him that “(w)hat’s next — all depends on you, what motivates you and what makes you happy — there will always be new challenges, but that is what life is all about...” In his response, Santa Maria spoke of his “exhaustion [that] comes from the industry often taking more from us than it gives” and his growing sense of disconnect. Again, he found that Ruth’s reply was on target: “Keep working on it — it is important to you, in your own personal development — that development is important — not the expectations of anyone else. Self-worth is so important.”

With the daunting external factors facing creatives — marketplace pressures, client expectations, the unceasing need to up one’s skills — the exchange between Santa Maria and Ruth is particularly reassuring. It highlights the commonality of professional burn-out, and provides some insight into the personal strength individuals can draw from. Here’s to hoping that Santa Maria continues to find his inspiration, and in doing so, share his story.

Photograph of Jason Santa Maria used with permission.

© Jason Saint Maria

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Guild Webinars

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Looking to keep up with industry trends and techniques?

Taking your creative career to the next level means you need to be up on a myriad of topics. And as good as your art school education may have been, chances are there are gaps in your education. The Guild’s professional monthly webinar series, Webinar Wednesdays, can help take you to the next level.

Members can join the live webinars for FREE - as part of your benefits of membership! Non-members can join the live webinars for $45. 

Visit our webinar archive page, purchase the webinar of your choice for $35 and watch it any time that works for you.

 


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