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Free Art Licensing Q&A with J’net Smith, December 14

Posted by Rebecca Blake on November 29, 2016

J’net SmithJ’net Smith of All Art Licensing is running her free Q&A on art licensing on December 14th. The session is open to designers, illustrators, cartoonists, and surface designers. Registrants can submit their questions in advance, and Smith typically covers 15-25 questions in each session. Because of the popularity of the sessions, participants are encouraged to register early to get their questions in the queue. Participants will also receive a free copy of Smith’s ebook, 20 Rules for Starting Your Art Licensing Business.

J’net Smith has contributed frequently to Guild resources. Most recently, she conducted a Guild webinar, “The New Art Licensing: Beyond the Basics,” which was well received this fall. She also extends a discount to Guild members on her licensing products and services. Currently, that discount is 25% off on all products and services, available for Guild members only through December 31st.

HOW Design Live: A Fun Pricing Game, and a Memorable Conference

Posted by Rebecca Blake on June 07, 2016

The Guild was invited to participate at HOW Design Live this past May, and decided to contribute a live version of our Pricing Game. For years, the Pricing Game has been one of our most popular webinars. Its advent was as a live event, created by the Boston Chapter of the Guild about 25 years ago, and continued annually by the New York Chapter for many years. (For the uninitiated, during the Game, the audience reviews the specs for actual design projects, and “bids” on what they would charge. Afterwards, the actual estimated and invoiced prices are revealed, and the designer’s pricing techniques are discussed.) While the format works as a webinar, the opportunity to bring it back live, with audience participation, was exciting.

For the HOW Design Live (HDL) Pricing Game, we solicited the work from three Guild members, all designers: Todd LeMieux (who is also our New England rep), Jonnie Bailey, and Peiro Salardi. Each contributed a beautiful piece of design – logo, brochure, and logo plus packaging, respectively – and more importantly, each had followed best practices in pricing and managing the project. The result was that the HDL Pricing Game attendees were treated to examples of beautiful work, as well as valuable insight into how competent professional designers conduct their business. The event was well received, in large part because the audience was so engaged in debating and defending their prices. A highlight was the heated (but polite) debate between “Mr. $500” and “Mr. $35,000”, who contested what the correct price for LeMieux’s logo design should be. (One was an independent designer working out of a small town, and the other worked in-house for a large branding agency – hence the huge pricing disrepency.)

Below: Last minute prep (and hyperventilating) before the presentation on Sunday.

HOW Design Live Pricing Game presentationHOW Design Live room sign

Overall, HOW Design Live was an inspiring conference. Presentations were organized into concurrent morning and afternoon sessions, with morning, noon, and evening keynote addresses. The organizers covered a wide base of topics, from very practical advice (such as our Pricing Game), to diversity, to entrepreneurial advice, to the purely creative and inspirational. The conference drew well-known speakers, such as Stefan Sagmeister, Chip Kidd, and Debbie Millman. Many of the presentations were memorable and unique, such as James Victore urging designers to celebrate their weirdness, Ellen Luna advising to let go of the “shoulds,” and Frederick Ost and Magnus Berg punctuating their gleefully obscene talk with live rock-and-roll.  

The unexpected bonus to HDL was connecting (and reconnecting) with other artist advocates. Highlights were a discussion with attorney Katie Lane on how we can educate better on intellectual property, and the evening spent catching up with art licensor J’net. Those discussions, and the interactions with HDL participants – during coaching sessions, or answering questions after the Pricing Game, or connecting with the local AIGA chapter – made HDL a truly wonderful experience.

Below: With slides like this, no wonder James Victore’s keynote address was wildly popular.

James Victore at HOW Design Live

Follow us on Instagram, and get a Peek into the Guild

Posted by Rebecca Blake on April 28, 2016

We’re now on Instagram! We’re working the platform to give a peek into the advocacy work we do, spread the word about design and illustration best practices, and partner with like-minded organizations. So far we’ve used our feed to participate in ico-D’s Design in Action campaign (leading up to World Design Day) – we snapped photos of unique projects that made our urban environments in Boston, DC, Maryland, and New York more sustainable. We’ll be using the account to provide a visual record of the somewhat dry advocacy work we do. Hopefully photos (like one of the extra-large cup of coffee required to get through several hours of dense copyright testimony) will bring our advocacy work to life. 

We’ve got several other Instagram campaigns in the works, designed to promote our members, showcase illustration at work, and highlight regional activities. We’re concerned about navigating the problems raised by Instagram’s Terms of service (see the note below), so we’d love to hear back on how illustrators use the platform, without risking that their copyrighted work will be compromised. We’d also love to see your Instagram posts, so follow us, and let us see what you’re up to as well. You can follow us at graphic_artists_guild or search for #everyartistcounts.

While Instagram can be a self-promotion asset to artists, the Guild does caution that uploading copyrighted work to the platform poses a risk. In 2013, the Guild joined ASMP and other photographers’ organizations in protesting Instagram’s wide-ranging terms of use, which grant the service broad usage rights to sublicense images and videos uploaded to the platform. Before posting original artwork, the Guild urges designers, illustrators, and photographers to read “The Instagram Papers” and understand the rights they’re giving away when using the platform.

Guild Instagram snapshots

Multiple Instagram Accounts for Your Design or Illustration Studio? Instagram Rolls Out Support

Posted by Rebecca Blake on February 10, 2016

Instagram logoInstagram has rolled out multiple account managment. The change is a boon to designers and illustrators who manage both personal and professional Instagram accounts. Users can download the latest version of the app (Instagram 7.15), and add additional up to five additional accounts. From there, changing between accounts is just a simple tap. The app identifies which account is active with the profile picture, so users know where they’re posting.

While Instagram can be a self-promotion asset to artists, the Guild does caution that uploading copyrighted work to the app poses a risk. In 2013, the Guild joined ASMP and other photographers’ organizations in protesting Instagram’s wide-ranging terms of use, which grant the service broad usage rights to sublicense images and videos uploaded to the platform. Before posting original artwork, the Guild urges designers, illustrators, and photographers to read “The Instagram Papers” and understand the rights they’re giving away when using the platform.

Instagram mulitple accounts management image

Paperwork: The Project Journey

Posted by Rebecca Blake on May 15, 2014

Illustrator's Union logoThe UK-based Illustrators’ Union has created a campaign to help illustrators stay on track in managing their paperwork. Called “The PaperWork Campaign,” the project tranlsates effective project management into simple steps, illustrated as a journey. The campaign breaks a project into four parts: First Contact, Agree to Proceed, Do the Work, and Project Wrap-Up. For each stage except “Do the Work” (which is self-explanatory), key questions and tasks are identified. The campaign covers often overlooked steps, such as setting copyrights and usage rights at the outset, or updating financial records and setting aside a percentage to cover taxes when the project concludes.

The PaperWork Campaign flags key steps with large, hard-to-ignore graphics. Even better, they back each step with a "Why Do This?" justification, followed by more detailed, relevant advice from seasoned professionals. The Campaign articles are liberally peppered with links to more in-depth articles on the zero2illo website, on topics such as “Marketing 101 for Illustrators” and “Managing Your Projects 101.” It’s a valuable resource for anyone structuring their project management workflow, or looking to revisit the systems they have in place.

Image © Illustrator’s Union. Used with permission.

The PaperWork Journey, © Illustrator's Union

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Guild Webinars

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Looking to keep up with industry trends and techniques?

Taking your creative career to the next level means you need to be up on a myriad of topics. And as good as your art school education may have been, chances are there are gaps in your education. The Guild’s professional monthly webinar series, Webinar Wednesdays, can help take you to the next level.

Members can join the live webinars for FREE - as part of your benefits of membership! Non-members can join the live webinars for $45. 

Visit our webinar archive page, purchase the webinar of your choice for $35 and watch it any time that works for you.

 


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