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Communication Design

Sunrise: Font Aid VII Creates a Collaborative Typeface for Typhoon Haiyan Relief

Posted by Rebecca Blake on November 25, 2013

The Society of Typographic Aficionados is doing it again: in response to the devastation wreaked by Typhoon Haiyan, they’re reissuing their Font Aid fundraising model. Font Aid VII calls on designers and typographers to create glyphs based on the eight-rayed sun featured on the Phillipine flag. The glyphs will be arranged in a typeface that will be offered for sale on the SoTA website; proceeds from the sale will got to Typhoon Haiyan relief efforts. The deadline for submissions is Sunday, December 1st. Participants are asked to submit vector artwork in black and white, to fit within a 10” square. The artwork cannot contain gradients, color, open or stroked paths, embedded images, or glyphs from existing typefaces. Submission guidelines and instructions are posted on the SoTA website.

SoTA has a long history of creating Font Aid initiatives. The original Font Aid project was spearheaded by Swedish designer Claes Källerson in 1999. It raised funds for UNICEF to aid victims of war and national disasters. Since then, Font Aid has been resurrected to meet other disasters: Font Aid II: September 11 (2001); Font Aid III: Fleurons of Hope (2005 – Indian Ocean earthquake and tsunamis); Font Aid IV: Coming Together (2010 – Haitian earthquake); Font Aid V: Made for Japan (2011 – Japanese earthquake and tsunami); and Font Aid VI: Aster Effects (2012 Hurricane Sandy). The typefaces created for Font Aid VI: Aster Effects and Font Aid V: Made for Japan are still available for sale on the SoTA website. Aster Effects features a glyphs created from astersixes and star symbols, whereas Made for Japan features symbols inspired by Japanese popular culture and historic imagery.

Artist Dies of Exposure: Tim Kreider on Working for Free

Posted by Rebecca Blake on November 10, 2013

© Tim KreiderThis October cartoonist and writer Tim Kreider had a particularly galling week, in which he received no less than three requests for his services, for free – in exchange for “exposure.” The experience drove him to issue a manifesto via The New York Times Op-Ed page, in which he calls upon his younger colleagues to not give away their work. In fairness, Kreider admits that many of the requests come from struggling organizations or publishers. But in his article, "Slaves of the Internet, Unite!" he accurately describes a cultural shift which has occurred, in which creative work has been devalued and demoted to “content”, and in which the ease of digitizing and accessing that work via the Internet has lead to stagnant income increases.

Kreider concludes his article by pointing out that businesses wouldn’t keep making the “free work for exposure” pitch unless it worked on somebody. In response he offers a bit of writing he’s willing to donate: a template for a polite refusal to send in answer  to the next request for free labor.

Tim Kreider splits his time between New York City and the Chesapeake Bay. He is the author of We Learn Nothing: Essays and Cartoons (Simon & Schuster), and his cartoons have been collected in three volumes by Fantagraphics.  He is a contributor to numerous publications, including The New York Times, The New Yorker, and Men’s Journal. He is also the creator of the cartoon, The Pain–When Will It End?, which appeared in the Baltiimore Sun from 2000-2012.

Image © Tim Kreider

The Challenge: Draw a Letter a Day

Posted by Rebecca Blake on October 28, 2013

Draw a Letter a Day, © The Weekend Lab

 

Need a quick creative break (and coffee just won’t do it)? The Weekend Lab is hosting a fun project, Draw a Letter a Day. Visitors to the site are invited to draw a designated letter on screen, download it to their computers, and submit it to either The Weekend Lab’s tumblr page or tweet it to @TheWeekendLab. The project’s tmblr page shows a charming range of letter ideas, from a stick-figure A to a Dino-the-dinosaur D. Since the letters are drawn on screen, each has a wonderful hand-drawn quality.

The project was designed by Savannah College of Art and Design graduate Andrew Herzog, and has already appeared on Best CSS. If you’re interested in participating, dive in soon. The project launched on October 23 and, with one letter appearing per day, is due to complete by November 17. As of Monday, October 28, they were already up to the letter F.

Images © The Weekend Lab.

CARE for Sandy, One Year Out

Posted by Rebecca Blake on October 25, 2013

Care for Sandy before & afterOn the first anniversary of Hurricane Sandy, it's fitting to revisit one of our favorite charities — one which creatives with good Photoshop skills can assist. CARE for Sandy (Cherished Albums Restoration Effort) was started by creative director Lee Kelly in response to a web post about a wedding photo which washed ashore after the hurricane devastated Staten Island. While tracking down the photo's owner and offering her restoration services, Kelly realized she could tap into her network of colleagues to organize assistance for other owners of damaged photos. On November 10 — 11 days after the hurricane slammed the metro-New York City area — CARE for Sandy was launched.

In the year since then, the organization has conducted numerous scanning events in Queens, Staten Island, Long Island, New Jersey, and Brooklyn, accruing a backlog of thousands of photos in need of repair. Over 550 volunteers have contributed their services so far, removing spots, grime, and scratches, repairing heavy water damage, and even rebuilding entire areas of the photos that have flaked or torn off. To date, over 1,100 photos have been adopted for restoration by volunteers. While CARE is not at the moment running scanning events, families or individuals can submit scanned photos to the organization by following their submission guidelines.

The CARE for Sandy website offers numerous resources for potential restorers or those with damaged photos. Amateur restorers intent on building their skills should visit the website's Restoration Toolbox. It features a number of how-to videos on clone and heal tools, color correction for restoration, and masking tips, as well as guidelines on avoiding painted or noticeably artificial results. For those with photos that are  stuck to their frames, or have become "photo bricks" – photos that are stuck to each other once dried, or maybe even still moist, creating a solid “brick” of photos — the website has posted Salvaging Tips.

Moving forward, CARE for Sandy faces significant challenges. One is finding restorers with advanced retouching skills; as the website’s before and after gallery demonstrates, many of the photos require restoration skills which verge on the magical. Another obstacle is the abandonment of restoration projects (often with no communication) by volunteers who either become too busy or realize that their projects are too advanced for their skill set.

As an incentive to lure volunteers, the build-your-own-website company (and Kelly's webhost) virb has extended a discount of 50% for three months to CARE for Sandy volunteers. An additional incentive is a commemorative exhibition being planned for as early as this Spring, which will showcase the volunteers’ retouching skills. (CARE has received an impressive amount of press coverage – yet another perk for volunteers.)

While CARE has about 150 active volunteers at any one time, they are actively looking for more assistance from qualified individuals. Individuals interested in assisting can register online. For those wanting to see a sample of the kind of restoration work which is required, the website has posted ten “Adopt Me” galleries categorized by priority and skill level.. Kelly can also use help for a number of activities beyond photo restoration, from printing and framing photos for families, to creating content for CARE's news blog and contacting photo recipients. After countless hours of running CARE for Sandy, Kelly could also use a bit of personal assistance. As an experienced freelance creative director, she's always looking for paid work herself. After all, someone needs to pay the bills.

Above and below: some samples for CARE for Sandy photo restorations. Images © CARE for Sandy.

Adobe Reports Cyber Attack Breached Information for 2.9 Million Customers

Posted by Rebecca Blake on October 04, 2013

On October 3, Adobe reported that cyber attacks enabled attackers to download the customer data of about 2.9 million customers, including customer names, encrypted credit or debit card numbers, and expiration dates. Adobe does not believe that decrypted credit or debit card information was removed from the Adobe systems.

The attacks also permitted the removal of source code information on Adobe products, including Adobe Acrobat, ColdFusion, and ColdFusion Builder. While Adobe isn't aware of any "zero-day exploits" targeting Adobe products, they recommend the use of only supported versions of the software.

Adobe is resetting the passwords of affected customers, and has sent an email notification to those users with instructions on changing passwords and Adobe IDs. Adobe is also contacting customers whose credit or debit card information may have been compromised, and has notified banks processing Adobe customer payments. Federal law enforcement has also been contacted by Adobe.

Adobe has posted a security announcement on their website, as well as a blog post on the illegal access to their source code.

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