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Meet Yanique DaCosta, Southern Region’s Candidate for Representative!

Posted by Rebecca Blake on June 30, 2016

Yanique DaCostaThere’s a strong wind blowing from the South… We’re delighted to announce another candidate for regional representative, designer and fine artist Yanique DaCosta. DaCosta first came on our radar when she enthusiastically agreed to participate on a number of our member outreach initiatives, and her energy and drive – and infectious laugh – made a huge impression. So we were thrilled when she decided to run for the role of Southern Region Representative to National.

DaCosta originally hails from the South – the very far South beyond the US borders. She was born in Jamaica, but moved to Fort Lauderdale, FL in 2006. She has a long education in design in the arts: Associates degree in Graphic Design from Miami Dade, Bachelors in Studio Arts from Florida Atlantic U., and Masters degree in Media Arts from Full Sail. Her design firm, YKMD, focuses on brand development and new media. While her client base is broad, she’s been especially active in the entertainment industry, having worked on projects for HBO, ClearChannel, Atlantic Records, and Circle House Studios.

She has also continued to paint, and will be exhibiting later this year at a Caribbean art and music festival, as well as at Old Dillard High School Museum, a magnet school she first attended when arriving in the USA. In her spare time, she will be teaching a figure drawing at the African American Research Library and Cultural Center in Broward County, FL. The center is located in a predominantly African American and culturally enriched community, and teaching there is her way to give back to her community.

Below: DaCosta loves to connect with fellow designers, and continues to paint. (Used with permission)

Panique DaCosta arts advocatePanique DaCosta, fine artist

DaCosta became aware of the Guild from the designer Barry Zaid, who she meet in the hallways of Miami International University, and Art Institute. Zaid is an accomplished designer and illustrator, originally employed at Pushpin Studios in New York City. He employed DaCosta in his studio, helping to digitize his vast library of artwork (much of which was created before the advent of publishing software). In hearing DaCosta complain about the low fees – packaged as work for “exposure” – demanded by entertainment companies, Zaid suggested she take a look at the Guild, an organization he had joined years earlier. She did, and became a member in March 2016, wanting to be a part of an advocacy organization for visual artists. As she said, “What’s the point in just sitting around and complaining? Do something!”

She’d like to bring that energy and drive to the Guild board, working to raise awareness of the Guild and the initiatives we support. At the outset, she’s working on utilizing social media to get the Southern Region noticed, scheduling Twitter chats  and planning meetups. Her background in digital media and marketing is apparent; she’s already drafted a series of talking points based on information from our Handbook, and she’s gotten several design colleagues with big followings to participate. Her goal is to make the organization appear a bit less “starchy” so that our message of self empowerment and knowledge resonates. After all, “people won’t follow you unless they have a personal connection to you.”

You can connect with DaCosta through Twitter, Facebook, and Instagram. You can also check out her vlog on YouTube; her irreverent take on working for “exposure” is worth a listen. 

© Watermark: A Tool to Protect Your Work Under the DMCA

Posted by Rebecca Blake on June 29, 2016

Think putting a watermark with your name and copyright symbol detracts from your illustration? You may want to reconsider doing without it. In “CMI and the DMCA,” attorney Leslie Burns explains how including such information, called Copyright Management Information, gives you an additional, powerful tool to protect your copyrights online.

“Copyright Management Information” is defined by the Digital Millenium Copyright Act as “information conveyed in connection with” copies, displays, phonorecords, or performances of a work. The information is broadly defined, and can include the name of the work, the name of the author or copyright holder, identifying numbers or symbols, etc. That means a simple “© 2016 Your Name” inserted into the corner of your illustration or design qualifies as CMI.

As Burns elucidates, including your watermark on your image confers two tools you can use in addressing infringement. First, according to the DMCA, if an infringer removes your © watermark and reposts your image, the infringer has committed one to two violations of the law – each carrying statutory damages of at least $2,500 – whether or not you registered the work. Additionally, the removal of your watermark shows that the infringement was willful. That means if you did register your work, the statutory damages could go up to $150,000. (The minimum stays at $750.) It goes without saying that you should register the copyrights on any work you publish online!

Burns states that the notice needn’t be large – just legible – and recommends that the notice include the copyright symbol ©, the year of publication, and your name. She also points out that including the CMI increases the chance for damages to be awarded  – which would make a lawyer far more inclined to take the case on a contingency basis.

Leslie Burns is a California-based lawyer specializing in copyrights, contracts, and business law. Her background makes her a unique advocate for visual artists – for years, she was the studio and marketing manager for photo illustrator Stephen Webster. Her articles are both entertaining and informative; her article “More Monkey Business” (published on her Burns Auto Parts blog) was one of the most amusing takes on the monkey selfie dispute in 2014.

Below: Burns' copyright notice on her photograph (snapped while in law school) isn't large, but clearly imparts her information. (Used with permission.)

Life as a Law Student, photo © Leslie Burns

HOW Design Live: A Fun Pricing Game, and a Memorable Conference

Posted by Rebecca Blake on June 07, 2016

The Guild was invited to participate at HOW Design Live this past May, and decided to contribute a live version of our Pricing Game. For years, the Pricing Game has been one of our most popular webinars. Its advent was as a live event, created by the Boston Chapter of the Guild about 25 years ago, and continued annually by the New York Chapter for many years. (For the uninitiated, during the Game, the audience reviews the specs for actual design projects, and “bids” on what they would charge. Afterwards, the actual estimated and invoiced prices are revealed, and the designer’s pricing techniques are discussed.) While the format works as a webinar, the opportunity to bring it back live, with audience participation, was exciting.

For the HOW Design Live (HDL) Pricing Game, we solicited the work from three Guild members, all designers: Todd LeMieux (who is also our New England rep), Jonnie Bailey, and Peiro Salardi. Each contributed a beautiful piece of design – logo, brochure, and logo plus packaging, respectively – and more importantly, each had followed best practices in pricing and managing the project. The result was that the HDL Pricing Game attendees were treated to examples of beautiful work, as well as valuable insight into how competent professional designers conduct their business. The event was well received, in large part because the audience was so engaged in debating and defending their prices. A highlight was the heated (but polite) debate between “Mr. $500” and “Mr. $35,000”, who contested what the correct price for LeMieux’s logo design should be. (One was an independent designer working out of a small town, and the other worked in-house for a large branding agency – hence the huge pricing disrepency.)

Below: Last minute prep (and hyperventilating) before the presentation on Sunday.

HOW Design Live Pricing Game presentationHOW Design Live room sign

Overall, HOW Design Live was an inspiring conference. Presentations were organized into concurrent morning and afternoon sessions, with morning, noon, and evening keynote addresses. The organizers covered a wide base of topics, from very practical advice (such as our Pricing Game), to diversity, to entrepreneurial advice, to the purely creative and inspirational. The conference drew well-known speakers, such as Stefan Sagmeister, Chip Kidd, and Debbie Millman. Many of the presentations were memorable and unique, such as James Victore urging designers to celebrate their weirdness, Ellen Luna advising to let go of the “shoulds,” and Frederick Ost and Magnus Berg punctuating their gleefully obscene talk with live rock-and-roll.  

The unexpected bonus to HDL was connecting (and reconnecting) with other artist advocates. Highlights were a discussion with attorney Katie Lane on how we can educate better on intellectual property, and the evening spent catching up with art licensor J’net. Those discussions, and the interactions with HDL participants – during coaching sessions, or answering questions after the Pricing Game, or connecting with the local AIGA chapter – made HDL a truly wonderful experience.

Below: With slides like this, no wonder James Victore’s keynote address was wildly popular.

James Victore at HOW Design Live

Introducing Joseph Caserto, Eastern Region’s New Representative

Posted by Rebecca Blake on May 24, 2016

Joseph CasertoThe Guild’s Eastern Region is delighted to announce their new representative to National: designer Joseph Caserto. Caserto is a long-time Guild member and local advocate for visual creators, an active member of AIGA, the Freelancers Union, the Graphic Artists’ Guild, and SPD, the Society of Publication Designers. He sat on the Freelancers Union Board of Directors from 2011-13, and is on the SPD Student Outreach Committee, where he chaired the annual Pub(lications) Crawl from 2008-12. More recently, Caserto was featured in Guild enews for taking his alma mater, Pratt Institute, to task for crowdsourcing their mascot design, which set a terrible example for their students.

Caserto has had a long career as a designer, working primarily as a publication designer and independent art director. He is currently a freelance art director and designer whose clients have included Billboard, BusinessWeek, Fortune, Marie Claire, and Vibe magazines. Every year since 2008, Caserto has won American Graphic Design Awards from GD USA magazine. In 2008, he also received a Create Award. Caserto has taught extensively, having lectured at CUNY and NYU, and contributed to the Udemy.com learning platform. In fact, for the past few years, he’s extended a member discount on his Udemy tutorials on basic design and coding skills.

World Design Summit – Montréal 2017: Call for Speakers

Posted by Rebecca Blake on May 20, 2016

The organizers of the World Design Summit – Montréal 2017 have an ambitious vision: to bring together designers across all disciplines with government representatives, industry business leaders, NGOs, and the media to address how design can shape the future. The event will be a 10-day affair taking place in October, and will tackle issues such as environmental sustainability, societal pressures, and political instability. The program is summarized as, “More than a mere celebration of design, the summit will demonstrate the tremendous power of design to create viable solutions to global social, economic, cultural and environmental challenges.”

To that end, the Summit organizers have issued a call for speaker proposals. Practitioners of all design disciplines – architectural, landscape, graphic, communication, experiential, user interface, industrial, interior, etc. – and stakeholders are invited to submit proposals. Interested parties are encouraged to address the major themes of the summit: Design for Participation (participation in the political process and public discourse), Design for Earth (environmental sustainability), Design for Beauty (promoting well being), Design for Sale (commodities created with the greater good in mind), Design for Transformation (responding to environmental and societal changes), and Design for Extremes (supporting sociological, economic, and political migrations). Speaker proposals are due July 29th, and should include a 500-word abstract, 40-word summary, and five key words.

The Summit agenda will include an accredited conference for students, professionals, and stakeholders; a summit of over 50 organizations; a festival taking place in over 30 locations around Montreal, and an exhibit of design-related products and services. The Summit of organizations will seek to produce a joint declaration of intent and proposal for the design community to effect positive change (social, economic, and environmental) through multidisciplinary means.  The Summit founding partners are ico-D (International Council of Design), IFLA (International Federation of Landscape Architects), and IFHP (International Federation of Housing Planning), with support from the governments of Canada, Quebec, and Montreal.

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