| Forgot Password?

Remembering Mandela: The Mandela Poster Project

Posted by Rebecca Blake on December 23, 2013

Icograda Mandela Poster ProjectIn recognition of the passing of Nelson Mandela, we’re revisiting the Mandela Poster Project, and Icograda-endorsed initiative which took place this summer. The project was initiated by South African designers Jacques Lange and Mohammed Jogie. It sought to celebrate Mandela’s 95th birthday by soliciting poster submissions from the global design community. From the outpouring of 700 submissions from 70 countries, 95 posters were selected for exhibition. With the contributors’ permission, limited editions of some posters were printed and sold, with proceeds going to Nelson Mandela Children’s Hospital Trust. The funds will assist in the estblishment of a dedicated children’s hospital in Johannesberg – Africa’s third, and a final wish of Nelson Mandela’s.

The poster project submissions highlight Mandela’s influence and impact globally. Many of the designs reference his distinctive features and Africa, combing the shape of the continent with portraits of Mandela, and using the South African national colors. But many designs also incorporate the designer’s native cultural references, incorporating patterns, imagery, and typography unique to that individual’s culture. The overall effect reinforces the universality of Mandela’s message of empowerment, justice, and ultimately, harmony.

More about the Mandela Poster Project can be viewed at Mohammed Jogie's presentation to TEDxSoweto.

Below: Poster designed by Canadian designer Robert L. Peters. Poster © Nelson Mandela Children's Hospital Trust.

Digital Advent Calendar: The Christmas Experiments

Posted by Rebecca Blake on December 20, 2013

Now in its second year, the Christmas Experiments continues to showcase the quirky, fantastic holiday musings of coders and digital artists.  Christmas Experiments functions as an online calendar, with a new offering revealed every day up through Christmas Eve. The submissions range from fun animations, such as “The Christmas Playlist” by David Donut, to winter landscapes, dancing Santas, interactive games, and a singing moose. Each project is a unique creation showcasing the talents (or providing a canvas for some experimental work) of the coder or artist.

One forewarning: some of the projects do not function well in Firefox or Safari. For the best user experience, we recommend downloading the latest version of Chrome – it’s worth your while.

Below: December 9-12 offerings on the Christmas Experiments website. Image © Christmas Experiments.

Christmas Experiments

Butterick’s Practical Typography

Posted by Rebecca Blake on December 19, 2013

Butterick's Practical TypographyLawyer and type designer Matthew Butterick has self-published a treatise on typography: Butterick’s Practical Typography. Although the book is targeted to non-designers, it is a clear, easy-to-follow overview of the basics of typography that even designers well-versed in type layout will enjoy revisiting. Butterick builds a solid basis on typography best-rules, starting with “Why Typography Matters,” and proceeding with thorough discussions of type composition, formatting, font choice, and page layout. He concludes with an appendix of valuable features such as a meaty bibliography, a list of bad typewriter habits, and keyboard shortcuts for common accented characters.

Butterick’s Practical Typography is not only a well written treatise on the fundamentals of sound type usage, but also an experiment in web-based book publishing. Butterick created Pollen, the publishing system used for the book, using the programming language Racket. The result is a simple, elegantly designed online publication which is easy to navigate and free. Butterick intends to keep the book ad-free, but requests that users support the expensive project by buying Butterick’s fonts, sending a donation, or buying his previous book, Typography for Lawyers.

Butterick comes by his expertise through a career built on design and typography. After receiving his BA from Harvard in visual and environmental studies, he worked as a type designer and engineer at the Font Bureau, and created Herald Gothic, Wessex, and Hermes. After founding the web design firm Atomic Studio (later bought by Red Hat), he went to UCLA Law School and joined the California Bar.

Crafting a Portfolio for Licensing Your Art

Posted by Rebecca Blake on November 29, 2013

J'net SmithJ’Net Smith, owner of All Art Licensing, recently featured an article on “5 Top Portfolio Tips for Art Licensors.” In the articles, she shares her tips on the size of the portfolio, how to organize the portfolio by theme and create flow from piece to piece, and how to select work for an online portfolio. She advises artists to select work that fully represents their style while being relevant to the current market. She also recommends that the work be organized keeping in mind how manufacturers approach their collections so as to minimize frustration when wading through a portfolio.

Smith recently completed a series of new classes on Art Licensing Essentials, Collections and Presentations, Marketing and Sales Techniques, Negotiations and Contracts, and PR and Promotion Essentials. While the live classes concluded in mid-November, she's offering two classes as downloadable audios with over 70 slides, details, and a presentation. The classes, "Art Licensing Essentials — Creating Collections, Presentations and Websites" and "Developing Marketable Art Licensing Portfolios that Sell!" can be purchased from the All Art Licensing website. Smith will be offering new classes in 2014 — we'll keep you posted on her schedule.

New Avenue for Publicizing Logo Theft

Posted by Rebecca Blake on November 27, 2013

Logo Thief logoA newly-minted website is already having an impact. Logo Thief was conceived to display egregious examples of logo design infringement, and began publicizing examples in late November. Unlike many blogs which complain of copyright infringement, Logo Thief documents examples of logo infringement, providing links to the original creators’ websites and portfolios, as well as the posts by the infringing designers. The links are given in a list at the end of each article, forming a rough timeline of when the logo was original posted to the creator’s portfolio and when it appeared on the infringing website or materials. The LogoThief blog even shows overlaid examples of the original and infringing work — compelling evidence of outright copying.

In one case, a logo infringement showcased by Logo Thief came to a satisfying conclusion independently from the website. As reported in Steven Heller’s column, The Daily Heller, designer Felix Stockwell noticed that the new logo for one of his favorite eateries, Marie’s Cafe and Deli, was a direct ripoff of a logo created by Louise Fili, the renowned designer of many restaurant identities. Stockwell notified the restaurant’s owner, who was shocked and immediately removed the logo from their materials. As it turned out, the owner had purchased the logo for $25 from an offshore logo shop. Logo Thief reported on the positive development.

Other cases appearing on the LogoThief website have yet to be resolved in such a satisfying manner. In one case, a designer’s creation was copied from his LogoPond portfolio. Upon contacting the apparel company which reproduced a lightly altered version of his logo on their clothing, the company demanded proof of copyright ownership from the creator. Since then, the company modified the logo slightly, but the original structure is still clearly visible.

Previous Page   Next Page

How to Start your Very Own Communication Design Business!

Start Your Own Design Business - booklet cover - image

Digital Download

Enter your email address below to receive a FREE download of "Starting Your Own Communication Design Business" written by Lara Kisielewska. 

By signing up you will receive our monthly newsletter and occasional e-mails about our advocacy work. You will have the option to opt out at any time.

 

Guild Webinars

Webinar Banner image by Rebecca Blake

Looking to keep up with industry trends and techniques?

Taking your creative career to the next level means you need to be up on a myriad of topics. And as good as your art school education may have been, chances are there are gaps in your education. The Guild’s professional monthly webinar series, Webinar Wednesdays, can help take you to the next level.

Members can join the live webinars for FREE - as part of your benefits of membership! Non-members can join the live webinars for $45. 

Visit our webinar archive page, purchase the webinar of your choice for $35 and watch it any time that works for you.

 


Share

Follow Us