| Forgot Password?

Guild Participates in Creative Rights Caucus 2015 for the House Judiciary Committee

Posted by Advocacy Liaison on November 12, 2015

On November 3, Guild members Shaftel (Advocacy Liaison) and John Schmelzer (past National President) participated in the 2015 Creative Rights Caucus for the House Judiciary Committee in Washington, DC.  The event was held in a Judiciary Committee hearing room in the Rayburn House Office Building.
 
The Creative Rights Caucus is a bi-partisan legislative “listening” committee co-Chaired by Representative Judy Chu (D-CA) and Representative Doug Collins (R-GA). The event was organized by the Professional Photographers of America [PPA]. David Trust, Executive Director of the PPA, moderated the panel discussion. Panelists included photographer Denis Reggie, illustrator John Schmelzer, photographer Mary Fisk Taylor, graphic artist Lisa Shaftel, and photographer Michael Grecco.
 
We had an extraordinary turn-out of approximately 150 people and standing room only in the hearing room.
 
The Congressional Creative Rights Caucus is a bipartisan Caucus dedicated to protecting the rights of content creators. More importantly, the Caucus aims to help the public understand that we cannot judge the entertainment industry by how well famous Hollywood or music stars are doing.

Panelists L to R: Denis Reggie, John Schmelzer, Mary Fisk Taylor, Lisa Shaftel, and Michael Grecco. David Trust moderated at the podium. Rep. Judy Chu is seated behind Denis Reggie. Photo courtesy of PPA.

2015 Creative Rights Caucus panelists. © PPA

Sheila Copps Challenges Designers to Address Global Issues

Posted by Rebecca Blake on November 03, 2015

At the Eeum Design Connects international congress this past October in Gwangju, South Korea, Sheila Copps delivered a riveting keynote address that challenged the design community to effectively address global issues such as climate change and sustainability. Copps currently heads the World Summit and Congress of Architecture + Design + Planning, the 2017 international design congress which will bring together a multitude of design disciplines. She was asked to replace the scheduled keynote speaker, Victor Margolin, who was sadly injured right before the Congress.  If the last-minute call caused any difficulty, it wasn’t evident in either the content or delivery of her speech.

In her address, Copps focused on how design can be used as a leverage for political action. She related that in her 25+ years in politics, she never heard from designers or design organizations, despite the fact that designers work on solutions to many of the issues being addressed by communities and governments. She then asked when, where, and how do designers connect with decision-makers:

“Designers who come together for the common good of the community will get the ear of government… Designers CAN change the world. You design for people. You do not design in a void.”

She concluded her address with ten steps the design communities can take to connect to decision makers, governments, and communities:

1.    Determine the outcomes do we want, and reverse engineer those outcomes.
2.    Create simple concepts such as “green design” that are easily communicated and which people can rally around.
3.    Develop metrics and measurement tools that international decision makers can implement.
4.    Utilize international design champions to promote our common objective.
5.    Determine the ten key elements of what constitutes good design in a horizontal fashion.
6.    Measure the real cost of cradle to grave cost of disposability.
7.    Create template for action that is easily understood by governments, NGOs, and the business community, so that design becomes a sustainable economic driver.
8.    Create great design which adds value to society that will build value in cities, communities, buildings, etc.
9.    Create the potential for tax incentives. Financial incentives come from a design connection that understands how to make good politics.
10.  Help policy makers develop tools so that we can measure our footprints.

 

ico-D General Assembly Sets an Ambitious Agenda for Design Associations

Posted by Rebecca Blake on October 29, 2015

The ico-D General Assembly 26 took place October 22-23, following Eeum, the International Design Congress in Gwangju, South Korea. This year saw an increased role for the Guild, since as Guild representative to the organization, I agreed to head an ico-D workgroup on national design policies. The workgroups were initiated last year to meet requests for resources in key areas: design education, national design policies, communicating the value of design, and design certification. While the workgroups have been meeting via Skype since late summer – a scheduling challenge, since participants hail from diverse time zones – the first ever face-to-face meeting of the workgroups occurred during the Design Congress in Gwangju.

For the national design policy workgroup, the meetings were very fruitful, yielding numerous contacts among individuals involved with drafting or otherwise participating in their country’s national design policy. While the United States is highly unlikely to ever create a national design policy, preferring instead to permit the free market foster design achievement, the Guild perceives a value to our members in having such policies adopted elsewhere. National design policies across the globe address weaknesses in design education and a lack communication between designers and businesses, and promote increased awareness and respect of intellectual property rights. The organization has also expressed an interest in developing an anti-spec workgroup, in which the Guild intends to be active.

Discussion at the Professional Platform Meeting: (from right) Zachary Ong, Malaysia; Tyra von Zweibergk, Sweden; Rebecca Blake, Guild representative; Rita Siow, Australia; and Rogert Golgowski, Germany. Photo by Idzwan Junaidi.

ico-D General Assembly 26 professional platform meeting

At the General Assembly following the Design Congress, ico-D board members reported on the continuing financial health of the organization, reported on activities achieved throughout the year, and elected the board for the 2015-2017 term. I was elected again to serve another two-year term on the organization’s Audit Committee (headed by Rita Siow), which oversees financial reports and documents from the board on behalf of the ico-D members. In a touching speech, former president Robert Peters gave tribute to Past President Iva Babaja, who guided ico-D through a tulmutuous period. The General Assembly also viewed a presentation from the organizers of the 2017 World Design Summit, scheduled to take place in Montréal, Canada. The Summit is intended to be the largest gathering ever for designers, urban planners, architects and related stakeholders, and will address global issues of sustainability from a design perspective. ico-D is one of three Steering Committee members of the Summit.

The newly elected ico-D board (left to right): VP Wang Ziyuan (China)
, VP Heidrun Mumper-Drumm
 (USA), VP Antoine Abi Aad
 (Lebanon), Treasurer Peter Florentzos (Australia), President David Grossman (Israel), Secretary General Tyra von Zweigbergk (Sweden), President Elect Zachary Haris Ong (Malaysia), Past President Iva Babaja (Croatia), and VP Cihangir Istek (Turkey).

ico-D board 2015-2017

The Restrictions in Stock Image Licenses Illustrators and Designers Need to Know

Posted by Rebecca Blake on October 06, 2015

Microstock websites – websites that purvey low-cost photos, illustrations, and icons – have become a standard image source for designers with small budgets and undiscriminating clients. Illustrators have also used microstock, either in the creation of collage or montaged imagery, or as reference material for illustrations. However, both designers and illustrators are cautioned to read through the licenses employed by microstock sites. The low fees and “royalty free” label extended by microstock sites do not translate to unlimited use of their images.

The terms of use of six microstock sites reviewed for this article – Thinkstock, Shutterstock, Getty, iStockPhoto, Dreamstime, and 123RF – all clearly stipulate that their licensed imagery cannot be used in the creation of logos, service marks, or trademarks. The language used to define the restriction varies slightly from site to site. Getty Images implies that an exception to the restriction can be requested in writing. Dreamstime restricts the use of their images in the creation of trademarks, but not logos. The remaining four sites are unambiguous in prohibiting the use of their licensed image in logo creation.

Restrictions which would affect illustrators seeking to use stock imagery as source material are not always as clearly spelled out. The license agreement for Getty Images is an exception; it states: “Licensee may not falsely represent, expressly or impliedly, that Licensee is the original creator of a visual work that derives a substantial part of its artistic components from the Licensed Material.” Of the licenses reviewed, only iStockphoto’s license includes similar language to Getty’s, but the other terms do restrict the reselling of their images. Since the authors of the microstock images retain the copyrights, one can reasonably surmise that an illustration based on a stock image may not be copyrightable.  A safer course of action for illustrators is to use source material that is clearly in the public domain.

There is a downside to using microstock sites in general. Much of the imagery uploaded to the sites is trite, stereotypical, or simply poorly executed. (Stock photos were beautifully lampooned by the fake images created to mark the release of the film, “Unfinished Business.”) Microstock is also blamed for devaluing the illustration and photography professions by using an unsustainable business model that can’t support professionals.

The license agreements for the stock images sites are:
123RF
Dreamstime
Getty Images
iStockPhoto
Shutterstock
Thinkstock

Below: highlighted portions of the Getty, iStockphoto, and Dreamstime licenses.

iStockPhoto license Getty Images license Dreamstime license

Guild Member Discount for HOW Interactive Design Conference Boston, Nov. 5-7

Posted by Rebecca Blake on September 30, 2015

At the HOW Interactive Design Conference (HIDC) in Boston November 5-7, designers and developers will explore the intersection of design and technology. The conference is packed with seminars, breakfasts, and happy hours. Talks will be given by industry leaders, such as Jen Simmons, designer and host of The Web Ahead, and Stephan Mumaw, Director of Creative Strategy at Hint and author of Creative Bootcamp. Guild members are invited to attend the conference at a discount of $50 off the registration fee. Register online on the conference website with the code GAG50.

HOW Interactive Design

Previous Page   Next Page

How to Start your Very Own Communication Design Business!

Start Your Own Design Business - booklet cover - image

Digital Download

Enter your email address below to receive a FREE download of "Starting Your Own Communication Design Business" written by Lara Kisielewska. 

By signing up you will receive our monthly newsletter and occasional e-mails about our advocacy work. You will have the option to opt out at any time.

 

Guild Webinars

Webinar Banner image by Rebecca Blake

Looking to keep up with industry trends and techniques?

Taking your creative career to the next level means you need to be up on a myriad of topics. And as good as your art school education may have been, chances are there are gaps in your education. The Guild’s professional monthly webinar series, Webinar Wednesdays, can help take you to the next level.

Members can join the live webinars for FREE - as part of your benefits of membership! Non-members can join the live webinars for $45. 

Visit our webinar archive page, purchase the webinar of your choice for $35 and watch it any time that works for you.

 


Share

Follow Us